Being Highly Sensitive and Creative - Page 18

information from both inner and outer worlds can be "too much" at times and result in more pain, fatigue, stress, anxiety and other reactions. An intriguing neuroscience research study I came across that may explain some of this said people with nervous systems having decreased latent inhibition are more open to incoming stimuli. Which can be a good thing, or not so good. Actor Amy Brenneman once commented, "I'm too sensitive to watch most of the reality shows. It's so painful for me." That kind of pain or discomfort can mean we don't choose to experience some things that might actually be fun or enriching. Though I don't mean reality shows. 2. Affected by emotions of others Another aspect of sensitivity can be reacting to the emotions - and perhaps thoughts - of others. Being in the vicinity of angry people, for example, can be more distressing. As actor Scarlett Johansson once put it, "Sometimes that awareness is good, and sometimes I wish I wasn't so sensitive." 3. Need lots of space and time to ourselves We may need to "retreat" and emotionally "refresh" ourselves at times that are not always best for our goals or personal growth. For example, being at a professional development conference, it may not be the most helpful thing to leave a long presentation or workshop in order to recuperate from the emotional intensity of the crowd. 4. Unhealthy perfectionism There can also be qualities of thinking or analyzing that lead to unhealthy perfectionism, or stressful responses to objects, people or situations that are "too much" or "wrong" for our sensitivities. 5. Living out of sync with our culture