Beacon Tabs 2018 Down on the Farm - Page 4

® 4-B THE BEACON www.coshoctonbeacontoday.com APRIL 4, 2018 Salmonella is ‘no yolk’ when raising backyard chickens City dwellers and suburbanites have flown the coop, so to speak. A growing interest in raising chickens has enabled coops and nesting birds to spring up in neighborhoods one would not typically associate with chickens. Sometimes dubbed “urban homesteading” or “urban farming,” these homegrown operations enable people to enjoy fresh eggs from the comfort of home. Henhouses are just another extension of methods to reap the benefits of fresh, local and non-factory-produced foods. Although advocates insist that raising chickens on a small scale makes the birds less likely to carry disease than factory-farmed chickens, anyone raising chickens needs to be aware of the potential for disease, particularly salmonella. Also, it’s important to care for chickens in a manner that is humane and in line with local laws. What is salmonella? Salmonella is a common bacteria that lives in the intestinal tract of humans, other mammals and some birds, including chickens. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that approximately 1.2 million illnesses and 450 deaths are attributed to salmonella annually in the United States. The illness causes diarrhea, fever and abdominal cramps between 12 and 72 hours after infection and can last between four and seven days. Salmonella can cause death when not properly treated with antibiotics. Spreading salmonella Although humans cannot catch salmonella from chickens the way one would contract a cold, they can catch it through handling or consuming eggs of infected birds. The rural newsletter and farming resource Grit Contributed | Beacon says salmonella can then be transmitted to humans who eat improperly cooked meat or eggs from infected birds or from putting their hands in your mouths after touching chickens or eggs that have come in contact with contaminated rodent or chicken feces. The elderly, people with weakened immune systems and young children are at the highest risk for salmonella infection than others. Children who help gather eggs and do not thoroughly wash their hands afterward can be at increased risk. Reducing risk Maintaining clean conditions and routinely inspecting chickens for good health can help lower the risk of salmonella infection. Chicks and adult chickens that have salmonella may produce loose yellow or green droppings; have a drop in egg production, increased thirst and decreased feed consumption; and show signs of weight loss. Look for rodents in the henhouse, as infected mice or other small rodents may transmit salmonella as well. Chickens also need safe, roomy clean conditions to remain healthy and content. According to the resource MyPetChicken, a diet of whole grains and seeds also may be associated with decreased salmonella colonies. Some experts warn against washing eggs as a preventative method. According to a report written by Diane Schivera, an organic livestock specialist for the Maine Organic Farmers and Gardeners Association, thoroughly cleaning egg shells can remove a protective “bloom” that prevents bacteria from entering eggs. Eggs shouldn’t be scrubbed, but some suggest a warm water rinse that will push dirt away from the shell’s pores. Old eggs are more susceptible to bacteria penetration. Storing eggs at room temperature may cause them to degrade faster. Once eggs are gathered, individuals should wash their hands and make sure the eggs are chilled. Salmonella can be prevented in backyard chicken coops. Plus, it’s important to note that risk of infection is very small. The American Egg Board’s Egg Safety reference says an average consumer might encounter a contaminated egg once every 84 years. Contributed | metrocreativeconnections.com FARMS AUCTIONS NOW IS THE TIME TO SCHEDULE YOUR 2018 AUCTION FOR SPRING JON IANNIELLO AGENCY INC Insurance and Financial Services Agent 139 A SOUTH 3RD ST COSHOCTON, OH 43812 CALL ME TODAY! We Get Results! 0009_040418 Terry Longsworth 740-622-6230 Auctioneer/Broker® Sharon Longsworth 740-622-6230 Realtor® Joe Scott 740-502-6221 Realtor® Bob Nelson 740-622-1922 Realtor® Gary Chaney 740-498-4545 Realtor® 316 Main Street • West Lafayette (740) 545-7186 Fax: 740-545-6899 Auction: 740-545-7158 Branch Office: 740-498-4545 www.dalegress.com 740.294.5953 Offering: • Auto • Home • Life • Mutual Funds* • Variable Universal Life* • Variable Annuities* • IRAs* • 40l(k)s* *Securities offered through Farmers Financial Solutions, LLC. Member FINRA & SIPC 0011_011117 “ I can already tell it’s WAY better built than anything you can get at the box store. ” --Idelle F. Riccar Brilliance Deluxe Owner The First Name in Vaccums that Last TM 313 Main St., Coshocton 740-622-5956 mercantileonmainllc.com 0026_040418 4-B THE BEACON www.coshoctonbeacontoday.com APRIL 4, 2018 Salmonella is ‘no yolk’ when raising backyard chickens City dwellers and suburbanites have fl own the coop, so to speak. A growing interest in raising chickens has en- abled coops and nesting birds to spring up in neighbor- hoods one would not typically associate with chickens. Sometimes dubbed “urban homesteading” or “urban farming,” these homegrown operations enable people to enjoy fresh eggs from the comfort of home. Henhouses are just another extension of methods to reap the bene- fi ts of fresh, local and non-factory-produced foods. Although advocates insist that raising chickens on a small scale makes the birds less likely to carry disease than factory-farmed chickens, anyone raising chickens needs to be aware of the potential for disease, particu- larly salmonella. Also, it’s important to care for chickens in a manner that is humane and in line with local laws. What is salmonella? Salmonella is a common bacteria that lives in the intestinal tract of humans, other mammals and some birds, including chickens. Th e U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that approximately 1.2 million illnesses and 450 deaths are attributed to salmonella annually in the United States. Th e illness causes diarrhea, fever and abdominal cramps between 12 and 72 hours after infection and can last between four and seven days. Salmonella can cause death when not properly treated with antibiotics. Spreading salmonella Although humans cannot catch salmonella from chickens the way one would contract a cold, they can catch it through handling or consuming eggs of infected birds. Th e rural newsletter and farming resource Grit AUCTIONS NOW IS THE TIME TO JON IANNIELLO AGENCY INC JON IANNIELLO AGENCY INC SCHEDULE YOUR 2018 Insurance and and Insurance AUCTION FOR SPRING Financial Services Agent Financial Services Agent CALL ME TODAY! Terry Sharon Longsworth Longsworth 740-622-6230 740-622-6230 Auctioneer/Broker® Realtor® Joe Scott 740-502-6221 Realtor® Bob Nelson 740-622-1922 Realtor® Gary Chaney 740-498-4545 Realtor® Results! CALL ME TODAY! 139 A 139 SOUTH 3RD 3RD ST ST A SOUTH COSHOCTON, OH 43812 COSHOCTON, OH 43812 We Get Contributed | metrocreativeconnections.com 740.294.5953 740.294.5953 Offering: Offering: • Auto • Home • Life • Auto • • Home Life • Variable Universal Life* Mutual • Funds* Variable • Annuities* IRAs* • 40l(k)s* • Mutual • Funds* Variable • Universal Life* • Variable Annuities* • IRAs* • 40l(k)s* *Securities offered through Farmers Financial 316 Main 7G&VWB( "vW7BfWGFPsCSCRsbfsCSCRc6WF22V&W"d$b40V7FsCSCRsS'&6n6SsCCCSCR6V7W&FW0ffW&VBF&Vvf&W'2f6wwrFVw&W726Х6WF22V&W"d$b40( 6&VGFVN( 2t&WGFW"'VBFFpR6vWBBFR&7F&R( ТԖFVRb&66"'&Ɩ6PFVWRvW #eCCd$06G&'WFVB&V6626V6FV&RG&6֗GFVBFV0vVB&W&ǒ6VBVB"Vvw2g&fV7FV@&&G2"g&WGFrFV"G2W"WF2gFW FV6r66V2"Vvw2FBfR6R6F7@vF6F֖FVB&FVB"66VfV6W2FRVFW&ǒVRvFvVVVBVR77FV0BVr6G&V&RBFRvW7B&6f"6VfV7FFFW'26G&VvVvFW"Vvw0BFBF&Vvǒv6FV"G2gFW'v&B6&RB7&V6VB&6&VGV6r&6Fr6V6FF2B&WFVǒ7V7BЦr66V2f"vBVF6VvW"FR&6`6VfV7F662BGVB66V2F@fR6V&GV6R6RVr"w&VVG&w3fRG&Vvr&GV7F7&V6V@F'7BBFV7&V6VBfVVB67VFB6p6v2bvVvB72f"&FVG2FRVW6R2fV7FVB֖6R"FW"6&FVG2G&6֗@6V2vV66V26VVB6fR&ג6V6FF2F&VVFB6FVB66&FrFFR&W6W&6PוWD66VFWBbvRw&2B6VVG26&R766FVBvFFV7&V6VB6V6W26RWW'G2v&v7Bv6rVvw22&RЧfVFFfRWFB66&FrF&W'Bw&GFV'FR66fW&&v2ƗfW7F67V6Ɨ7Bf"FPR&v2f&W'2Bv&FVW'2766FF&Vvǒ6VrVvr6V26&VfR&FV7FfP( &( FB&WfVG2&7FW&g&VFW&rVvw2Vvw06VF( B&R67'V&&VB'WB6R7VvvW7Bv&vFW &6RFBvW6F'Bvg&FR6V( 2&W2BVvw2&R&R7W66WF&RF&7FW&VWG&F7F&rVvw2B&FVW&GW&R6W6RFVFFVw&FRf7FW"6RVvw2&RvFW&VBFfGV06VBv6FV"G2BR7W&RFRVvw2&P6VB6V6&R&WfVFVB&6&B66V62W2N( 2'FBFFRFB&6bfV7Fগ2fW'6FRW&6Vvr&&N( 2Vvr6fWG&VfW&V6R62fW&vR67VW"֖vBV6VFW"6F֖FVBVvr6RWfW'BV'2FRf'7BRf67V2FB7BDУ327B667FsCc#"SS`W&6FV26Ь*