Beacon Tabs 2018 Down on the Farm - Page 14

14-B THE BEACON www.coshoctonbeacontoday.com APRIL 4, 2018 Small local farm finds niche in agriculture community By Josie Sellers josie@coshoctoncountybeacon.com WALHONDING – Farming isn’t Mark Reed’s full time job, but he still works full time at it. Reed is a paramedic and firefighter in Columbus, but he and his family also operate Thousand Hill Acres, LLC in Walhonding. “Farmers don’t work 40 hours and then leave it at the door,” Reed said. “A lot of people depend on what you do. You have to be a veterinarian in situations that you can handle, you have to do research and development, be a people person because you want your customers to come back, and be your own financial advisor. You also are a husband and father.” The Reed family focuses on heritage breeds and has 53 head of grass fed and finished beef, 70 pasture raised chickens and they purchase pasture raised pigs from another farm that they have butchered. “Being a pastured based farm we have all the animals in their natural environment,” Reed said. “We’ve found it to be a good market for us.” They sell their meat to clients throughout Central Ohio and are especially busy in the summer with farmers markets. “We do marketing on the Internet and Facebook and have a lot of success in urban areas where there isn’t as easy access to a locally produced steak or pork chop,” Reed said. A day on the farm usually starts with chores in the morning. “The animals eat and then we eat,” Reed said. Josie Sellers | Beacon Pictured are Heritage Rhode Island Red Chickens from Thousand Hill Acres, LLC in Walhonding. “Through the winter it’s also a lot of research, development and planning for the next market season. We also have maintenance to do on things like fences and roads then there are evening chores, supper and family time.” Summer time also includes a lot of hay making. “Farmers also have to be conscious of their impact on the earth and ground and make sure you are taking precautions to eliminate runoff and soil erosion,” Reed said. He also has lessons he wants his children to learn from growing up on a farm. “I hope they learn responsibility for their actions, how to manage their time and money and that it helps them Josie Sellers | Beacon Mark Reed is pictured getting ready to pet one of his family’s Red Devon Cattle. understand life and death cycles and the importance of community,” Reed said. The Reed family includes Mark, his wife Torey and their children Charley – 7-years-old, Warren - 5 ½ - years-old, and Alden – 2-years-old. “It (the farm) started out as just Torey and I wanting to raise food to support ourselves, but then my mother and father-in-law got involved too and it became an agriculture enterprise,” Mark said. “I have a passion for taking care of the land and heritage breeds and supporting small local farmers.” CONSULTATION • SALES CUSTOM APPLICATION PROUD 4-H & FFA SPONSOR TMK BAKERSVILLE HAS AN ON-GOING COMMITMENT TO WORKING WITH FARMERS. Our business is agriculture. Just a few of the services that TMK offers: Certified crop adviser on staff, Bag & Bulk fertilizer and application, Chemicals and application, Lime & Limestone trucking & spreading, Liquid fertilizers, Pioneer seed, Dekalb & Asgrow seed, Baler twine/Bale Wraps. Phone: 330-897-3911 Toll Free: 1-800-445-4055 Fax: 330-897-3405 Mailing Address: PO Box 3068, Bakersville, Ohio 43803 0007_032614 Large or small, we can insure your farm needs. E A gency • NO APPOINTMENT NEEDED • OIL CHANGE ndsley INSURANCE • REAL ESTATE 740-622-1111 • 433 Walnut St., Coshocton www.EndsleyAgency.com SHRIVER TIRE SERVICE • BRAKE SERVICE • COMPUTER DIAGNOSTIC • TIRES - NEW & USED 740-622-6989 Hours: M-F 8-5 • Sat 8-Noon COMPLETE ON THE FARM SERVICE Call for a quote. 2171 Otsego Ave, Coshocton Great Service in a New Location! • FLAT REPAIR • ROTATIONS • SERVICE WORK 0027_092717 0034_032917 14-B THE BEACON www.coshoctonbeacontoday.com APRIL 4, 2018 Small local farm fi nds niche in agriculture community By Josie Sellers josie@coshoctoncountybeacon.com WALHONDING – Farming isn’t Mark Reed’s full time job, but he still works full time at it. Reed is a paramedic and fi refi ghter in Columbus, but he and his family also operate Th ousand Hill Acres, LLC in Walhonding. “Farmers don’t work 40 hours and then leave it at the door,” Reed said. “A lot of people depend on what you do. You have to be a veterinarian in situations that you can handle, you have to do research and development, be a people person because you want your customers to come back, and be your own fi nancial advisor. You also are a husband and father.” Th e Reed family focuses on heritage breeds and has 53 head of grass fed and fi nished beef, 70 pasture raised chickens and they purchase pasture raised pigs from another farm that they have butchered. “Being a pastured based farm we have all the animals in their natural environment,” Reed said. “We’ve found it to be a good market for us.” Th ey sell their meat to clients throughout Central Ohio and are especially busy in the summer with farmers markets. “We do marketing on the Internet and Facebook and have a lot of success in urban areas where there isn’t as easy access to a locally produced steak or pork chop,” Reed said. A day on the farm usually starts with chores in the morning. “Th e animals eat and then we eat,” Reed said. Josie Sellers | Beacon Josie Sellers | Beacon Pictured are Heritage Rhode Island Red Chickens from Thousand Hill Acres, LLC in Walhonding. Mark Reed is pictured gett ing ready to pet one of his family’s Red Devon Catt le. “Th rough the winter it’s also a lot of research, develop- ment and planning for the next market season. We also have maintenance to do on things like fences and roads then there are evening chores, supper and family time.” Summer time also includes a lot of hay making. “Farmers also have to be conscious of their impact on the earth and ground and make sure you are taking pre- cautions to eliminate runoff and soil erosion,” Reed said. He also has lessons he wants his children to learn from growing up on a farm. “I hope they learn responsibility for their actions, how to manage their time and money and that it helps them understand life and death cycles and the importance of community,” Reed said. Th e Reed family includes Mark, his wife Torey and their children Charley – 7-years-old, Warren - 5 ½ - years-old, and Alden – 2-years-old. “It (the farm) started out as just Torey and I wanting to raise food to support ourselves, but then my mother and father-in-law got involved too and it became an agricul- ture enterprise,” Mark said. “I have a passion for taking care of the land and heritage breeds and supporting small local farmers.” Large or small, we can insure your farm needs. CONSULTATION • SALES CUSTOM APPLICATION PROUD 4-H & FFA SPONSOR E ndsley gency Call for a quote. A I N S U R A N C E • R E A L E STAT E TMK BAKERSVILLE HAS AN ON-GOING COMMITMENT TO WORKING WITH FARMERS. 740-622-1111 • 433 Walnut St., Coshocton www.EndsleyAgency.com Our business is agriculture. SHRIVER Just a few of the services that TMK offers: Certified crop adviser on staff, Bag & Bulk fertilizer and application, Chemicals and application, Lime & Limestone trucking & spreading, Liquid fertilizers, Pioneer seed, Dekalb & Asgrow seed, Baler twine/Bale Wraps. TIRE SERVICE Phone: 330-897-3911 Toll Free: KN M KM MB^ NML BXZ[[Y\Έ Z\ݚ[K[ ¸(TSQSQQQ(SSBMHY]KۂܙX]\XH[H]][ۈB(RHTPB(TUTPQӓP¸(TT HU TQ(UTRT(USӔ¸(TPHԒ MMNB\ΈKQ MH8(] SۂTUHӈHTHTPB LM