Artborne Magazine November 2016 - Page 33

Brill Adium by Rob Goldman Brill Adium is making faces. In his art, the face says it all. In himself, the name says it all: Brill-iant. I like to pick apart names and see how they relate to people. I often think about the words that make up a name. His last name, Adium—not to be confused with odium—says something about who he is. The prefi x ad- means to, or toward, and -ium is a suffi x meaning “derivative of.” Adium is made of forward movement, always headed toward his goals. His art is crudely calculated. Its value comes from his preparation and his intention. There is a lot of life, emotion, experience, and especially pain fueling his work. The rather large-scale painting style means that the face he paints is sometimes the size of an average human torso. For the viewer, I believe he demonstrates a sense of introspection. When we look at ourselves in a mirror, almost always, we make eye contact with our refl ection. Adium translates that moment with his paintings. His politics is people. Of course, as an artist, his message is pure, so his art is not inherently political. You might say his political party is humanity, because it doesn’t seem like he’s one to take sides. He feels misunderstood, and he’s on the side of the misunderstood. If you ask me, everyone is misunderstood. We can all relate to Adium’s work in some way. That’s part of why it’s so valuable. It’s not just a piece of art, it’s a piece of himself. Adium is known by many as the owner of a company called Defi ned Enterprises. It is a gallery space in Altamonte Springs, and their goal is to provide a space for artists and creatives to pursue their imaginations. A recording studio and white room allow artists to record music and take videos and pictures, and the front gallery room has high ceilings and yellow walls with plenty of space for showing work. Defi ned Enterprises also has a video production team to assist their clients. According to their website, “Brill Adium hopes to infl uence every artist with a bit of inspiration upon working on their project.” I met Adium in his backyard garage-turned-studio, where he was working like a bee with two other local Orlando artists, Halsi and Diego Inkusual. It was a microcosm of eye candy, and I could feel the productive energy emanating from the garage door like a big steel oven. I can’t say the smell was too bad, either. My favorite piece in the room was probably a TV mounted inside a garbage can lid atop a garbage can painted all over with eyeballs. After Adium closed the squeakiest garage door in the world and turned off the industrial-strength fans, I whipped out my recording device and we got going. Orlando’s Art Scene, v. 1.5 Rob Goldman: What is your first memory? Brill Adium: [Laughing] First memory...in regards to what? Just think as far back as you can. What comes to mind? It is a random question, not all these questions are directly art related. (Or are they?) First memory…I think my fi rst memory is when I offi cially dropped out of high school. Is Orlando your hometown? No. I was born in Alabama, but I moved here around 10 th grade, so Orlando is practically my hometown. What is special about Orlando to you? When I was living in Alabama, it was either black or white [people.] No Spanish people, Jamaican people, Mexicans—only either black or white. But when I came to Florida, there were all these people, and all these languages they could speak. detail from: Promise to Never, acrylic on wood There are people from everywhere! One of the craziest things that I have noticed about Orlando is that a lot of people who are really trying to push for it are not the people originally from Orlando. Who are you portraying in your art? I use six faces in total. It is basically the six different emotions that we go through in life. We have all of these emotions, but for some people, one resonates more than all the others. You have wisdom, confusion, pain, ego, contentment, and the cover-up. Do you want to go into any of those? Which one stands out the most to you? Everybody relates to one more than the other. The cover-up is smiling, but at the same time, the smile is crossed out, which indicates the smile of an adult. All of us, when we’re smiling, often we’re actually covering something up. Then you have the wise one. Not wise on just an earth level, but a spiritual level. Then there is the content one. He has no goals. He is not worried about tomorrow, he is not worried about yesterday, he is only worried about now. He wants everybody to understand the importance of living in the now. Then there’s pain. This guy is full of pain—it is a refl ection of failed relationships—nothing has been perfect for this guy. He does not really understand love, because it was never given to him; failed relationships, failed friendships, not the perfect relationship with family. Then there is the confused one. When I say he is confused, I do not mean in the 32 Brill Adium by Rob Goldman Brill Adium is making faces. In his art, the face says it all. In himself, the name says it all: Brill-iant. I like to pick apart names and see how they relate to people. I often think about the words that make up a name. His last name, Adium—not to be confused with odium—says something about who he is. The prefix ad- means to, or toward, and -ium is a suffix meaning “derivative of.” Adium is made of forward movement, always headed toward his goals. Rob Goldman: What is your first memory? Brill Adium: [Laughing] First memory...in regards to what? Just think as far back as you can. What comes to mind? It is a random question, not all these questions are directly art related. (Or are they?) First memory…I think my first memory is when I officially dropped out of high school. His art is crudely calculated. Its value comes from his preparation and his intention. There is a lot of life, emotion, experience, and especially Is Orlando your hometown? pain fueling his work. The rather large-scale painting style means that No. I was born in Alabama, but I moved here around 10th grade, so the face he paints is sometimes the size of an average human torso. Orlando is practically my hometown. For the viewer, I believe he demonstrates What is special about a sense of introspecOrlando to you? tion. When we look When I was living in at ourselves in a mirAlabama, it was either ror, almost always, black or white [people.] we make eye contact No Spanish people, Jawith our reflection. maican people, MexiAdium translates that cans—only either black moment with his or white. But when I paintings. came to Florida, there were all these people, His politics is peoand all these languagple. Of course, as an es they could speak. detail from: Promise to Never, acrylic on wood There are people from artist, his message is pure, so his art is everywhere! 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