Artborne Magazine November 2016 - Page 26

began to view America as home, and she slowly started to take root. 25 Unlike Scotland, Illinois did not offer Hargrove lush landscapes with rich histories. In an effort to become rooted in America, she began to research her new home. As a country, America’s history only goes back a few hundred years, but if we have learned anything from Alfredo Jaar, there is more to America than the United States. When Hargrove moved to Central Florida to teach at Rollins College, she explored and studied her new surroundings. It is a personal goal of hers to discover new places every year, both in America and Scotland. The world offers so much history; we just have to be willing to take the time to seek it out and learn from it. One of Hargrove’s favorite local landmarks to visit was the three-thousand-year-old cypress tree fondly known as “The Senator,” which burned down due to arson in 2012. The tree had acted as a landmark long before central Florida became an urban city; Native Americans had used it as a marker for meetings and trails. Hargrove visited the tree shortly before its destruction and described how she Facade 4, acrylic on panel felt when she found out that the oldest bald cypress tree in the world had been destroyed: “A human life consists of a fraction of the time that the world has been around.” Placing herself as a speck on The Senator’s timeline was a humbling experience for her. Nature is a recurring theme in Hargrove’s work, whether the piece is a visual representation of nature, or the lack thereof. Her objective is to provoke conversations about the environment and how it is changing. “What amazing places are right there on your doorstep?” Hargrove asks. It is so easy to get caught www.ARTBORNEMAGAZINE.com Facade 4, acrylic on panel began to view America as home, and she slow- ery year, both in America and Scotland. The ly started to take root. world offers so much history; we just have to be willing to take the time to seek it out and Unlike Scotland, Illinois did not offer Hargrove learn from it. lush landscapes with rich histories. In an effort to become rooted in America, she began to re- One of Hargrove’s favorite local landmarks to search her new home. As a country, America’s visit was the three-thousand-year-old cypress history only goes back a few hundred years, tree fondly known as “The Senator,” which but if we have learned anything from Alfredo burned down due to arson in 2012. The tree Jaar, there is more to America than the United had acted as a landmark long before central States. When Hargrove moved to Central Flor- Florida became an urban city; Native Amerida to teach at Rollins College, she explored icans had used it as a marker for meetings and studied her new surroundings. It is a per- and trails. Hargrove visited the tree shortly sonal goal of hers to discover new places ev- before its destruction and described how she 25 felt when she found out that the oldest bald cypress tree in the world had been destroyed: “A human life consists of a fraction of the time that the world has been aroun B( 6rW'6Vb27V6FR6VF.( 2FVƖRv2V&ƖrWW&V6Rf"W"GW&R2&V7W'&rFVR&w&f^( 0v&vWFW"FRV6R2f7V&W&W6VFFbGW&R"FR6FW&VbW"&V7FfR2F&fR6fW'6F2&WBFPVf&VBBrB26vr( v@r6W2&R&vBFW&RW"F'7FW( &w&fR62B26V7FvWB6Vv@wwr%D$$TtR6Р