Art of Dying Volume II - Page 8

IRIS APFEL Some people look forward to death, and going to heaven and all of that. I don't think it's pleasant at all. I'm probably a bad subject for your magazine. You're asking me questions about things I don’t like to think about. I don't see any point. Maybe it’s important for other people. I don't like to think about death. It's spooky. Every once in a while, I think that I should, and I get very upset, so I don’t. I know I have to go, but I don't want to think about it. I’m not denigrating it. For me, it’s only confusing. When I have to face it, I will. What's fascinating about going to pieces or going to hell? I don't think about those things. That's one of the reasons I'm happy. I don't think about the past. "I get these questions, If you could do this again," or "If you could stay in a certain period of time." I don't think about that. That's finished. I don't try to conjure up the future. That's coming. I don't know what's going to happen. When it comes, I'll attend to it. I'm very much a person who lives in the now, and that's what I concentrate on. Now. I don't even like to concentrate on two weeks from now.  Enough unpleasant things happen that I'm obliged to think about, so why should I conjure more up?  I'm so busy, I don't have time to think about anything outside of what I'm doing. I really don't. I love life and I want to be around. Maybe there are people who dwell on death and have a plan. Maybe that's good. Maybe I should have one, but I don’t. I'm very much a person who lives in the now, and that's what I concentrate on. Now. I don't even like to concentrate on two weeks from now.  8 | ART OF DYING