Art Chowder May | June 2017, Issue 9 - Page 10

Being in the presence of an instructor allows for immediate feedback. Additionally, it is easier to watch and emulate in person. A tight-knit group, dancers form an immediate bond and look out for each other. Friendships formed are lasting. There is great respect in the field, and if you do not know the dancer directly, you know someone who knows them. Students gravitate to instructors based on the investment the teacher places in the in- dividual student. “It’s the devotion to dance that keeps you going.” Greene enjoys mak- ing dance happen for others and watching his students find their place. A mentor, he carries the great tradition to pass on to the next generation. Instruction in dance has metamorphosed over the past 60 years. Evolution in advising methods has transformed to fit the times. Current training and concepts have to move with technology in a versatile world. A revolutionary experiment in the 1950s changed the way dancers practiced. The Merce Cunningham Technique de-emotionalized dance, allowing the audience to draw their own conclusions. Known for collaboration with visual artists, designers, and musi- cians, he and John Cage examined dance not coordinated to music. Dancers worked with a rhythm and movement while musi- cians practiced separately only to come together at the event and create an experi- ence for the audience. More recent challenges for educators entail navigating the world of social media. Viral videos have prompted a larger interest in dance, but their downside is the temptation to set a goal for instant success determined by the number of hits and likes. Greene cautions, “Don’t let yourself be set on cruise control; don’t take the easy way; don’t skip the steps that will make you learn and grow.” 10 ART CHOWDER MAGAZINE “Don’t let yourself be set on cruise control; don’t take the easy way; don’t skip the steps that will make you learn and grow.”