Albert Lea Seed House Oat Production Guide - Page 11

know to exhibit similar or better allelopathic effects. Managing Cover Crops Profitably, 3rd Ed. 3rd ed. Sustainable Agriculture Network, 2007. 93-97. Print. 2 Herbicide Conventional systems also allow for use of herbicides to help promote weed control. When using herbicide control be sure to apply at the proper time to increase effectiveness and limit crop damage. Herbicide use is best when applied in the lag phase of growth, which occurs until the weed is about two inches in size. South Dakota State University and the Government of Saskatchewan provide good information for approved herbicides. The resources are as follows: - South Dakota Pest Management Guide for Small Grains -see pg. 7 - Government of Saskatchewan 2015 Guide to Crop Protection: weeds, plant disease, insects see pg. 45 Be sure to only use licensed and approved herbicides, and always follow label directions for application. Mechanical control Different types of mechanical control have been known to help with weed control. Use of a tine harrow and rotary hoe can help remove small weeds. These methods need to be used only in early growth of the oat plant. Mechanical control needs to take place before the oat plant reaches the two leaf stage. As with herbicide controls, mechanical control should be performed while weeds are just past emergence and while still in a lag phase of growth. Dr. Steve Shirtliffe, from the Crop Development Centre of the University of Saskatchewan, has done extensive research in mechanical weed control. For additional information and techniques see Dr. Shirtliffe’s research results. Heavier seeding rates may be needed to help make up for any reduction in the stand from tillage control. Managing Cover Crops Profitably, 3rd Ed. 3rd ed. Sustainable Agriculture Network, 2007. 93-97. Print 11