Agri Kultuur January / January 2018 - Page 58

motivated him to enrol at New Hope School of Nursing . He excelled in his studies , but had his heart set on becoming the first member of his family to gain a university degree . However , he first had to overcome a significant hurdle : to improve his physics and mathematics matric marks so that he could gain university access . After successfully completing evening classes at Garlandale High , he enrolled at the age of 23 years old at Stellenbosch University .
He received his first degree in 2009 – a BSc in Life Science , followed by an BSc Honours in Microbiology . A stint as a researcher in Prof Opara ’ s postharvest team was just the impetus he needed to first complete a MSc degree in Food Science , and now also a PhD . His wife , Zuraida , will receive her nursing qualifications this year from CPUT .
This father of two young boys already has eight peer-reviewed publications under his belt . One of these received the Douglas Bomford Award from the Institution of Agricultural Engineers ( IAgrE ) for the best paper published in 2017 in the leading agricultural engineering journal Biosystems Engineering .
He says that consumers are not pleased when they pay a premium for a whole pomegranate , only to find it to be rotten inside once they open it up to eat . To help producers sift quality fruit from the sub-optimal ones during the packaging process , Dr Arendse turned to existing X-ray computed tomography and near-infrared spectroscopy methods to look inside the fruit without damaging them .
Dr Arendse tailored these types of scans for use on “ Wonderful ” pomegranate . This variety often has unsightly superficial brown of the peel ( so-called husk scald ) on the outside , but in most cases , is still perfectly edible .
“ These scanning methods can also be used to trace whether miniscule pests are hiding inside the fruits ,” he says .
Knowing the actual volume of fruit that can be processed helps producers of value-added products like jams and juices to plan their manufacturing processes . As part of his PhD , Dr Arendse also developed models with which
AgriKultuur | AgriCulture to predict the edible volume of each fruit .
“ The husk often makes up half the volume of a pomegranate fruit , with the rest being the arils and juice ,” he explains .
Further work needs to be done before the scanning methods can be rolled out to industry .
Storing it better to keep it longer on the shelf : Dr Zinash Belay
Dr Zinash Assefa Belay , whose home language is Amharic , grew up in the Ethiopian capital of Addis Ababa . This former lecturer in food science at the university in her hometown has a keen interest in food security and nutrition , and her Master ’ s degree was on Food Engineering .
A fellowship from UNESCO ’ s Organization for Women in Science for the Developing World ( OWSD ) allowed her to pursue a PhD at an African university . Within hours of first contacting Prof Opara via email , her place was secured in his research team at Stellenbosch University .
“ I came here on 22 October 2014 ,” she still quite clearly remembers the date that she first arrived .
She hasn ’ t looked back since . As part of ongoing collaboration with the DST-NRF SARChI Chair in Postharvest Technology , part of her PhD research was also conducted at the Leibniz Institute for Agricultural Engineering and Bio-economy in Germany . The opportunity to work in another well-equipped laboratory with different instruments has allowed her to gain valuable practical experience .
“ And I learnt scientific writing from Prof Opara and the other learned members of the postharvest research group ,” she says by way of thanks .
She says that the bulk of all pomegranate harvested each year in South Africa is exported in one form or another . Most often , producers take the trouble to remove the arils from the fruit , to provide pre-packaged , readyto-eat and convenient product to consumers .
“ Once the arils inside a fruit are removed , 58
motivated him to enrol at New Hope School of Nursing. He excelled in his studies, but had his heart set on becoming the first member of his family to gain a university degree. However, he first had to overcome a significant hurdle: to improve his physics and mathematics matric marks so that he could gain university access. After successfully completing evening classes at Garlandale High, he enrolled at the age of 23 years old at Stellenbosch University. He received his first degree in 2009 – a BSc in Life Science, followed by an BSc Honours in Microbiology. A stint as a researcher in Prof Opara’s postharvest team was just the impetus he needed to first complete a MSc degree in Food Science, and now also a PhD. His wife, Zuraida, will receive her nursing qualifications this year from CPUT. This father of two young boys already has eight peer-reviewed publications under his belt. One of these received the Douglas Bomford Award from the Institution of Agricultural Engineers (IAgrE) for the best paper published in 2017 in the leading agricultural engineering journal Biosystems Engineering. He says that consumers are not pleased when they pay a premium for a whole pomegranate, only to find it to be rotten inside once they open it up to eat. To help producers sift quality fruit from the sub-optimal ones during the packaging process, Dr Arendse turned to existing X-ray computed tomography and near-infrared spectroscopy methods to look inside the fruit without damaging them. Dr Arendse tailored these types of scans for use on “Wonderful” pomegranate. This variety often has unsightly superficial brown of the peel (so-called husk scald) on the outside, but in most cases, is still perfectly edible. “These scanning methods can also be used to trace whether miniscule pests are hiding inside the fruits,” he says. Knowing the actual volume of fruit that can be processed helps producers of value-added products like jams and juices to plan their manufacturing processes. As part of his PhD, Dr Arendse also developed models with which AgriKultuur |AgriCulture to predict the edible volume of each fruit. “The husk often makes up half the volume of a pomegranate fruit, with the rest being the arils and juice,” he explains.  Further work needs to be done before the scanning methods can be rolled out to industry. Storing it better to keep it longer on the shelf: Dr Zinash Belay Dr Zinash Assefa Belay, whose home language is Amharic, grew up in the Ethiopian capital of Addis Ababa. This former lecturer in food science at the university in her hometown has a keen interest in food security and nutrition, and her Master’s degree was on Food Engineering.  A fellowship from UNESCO’s Organization for Women in Science for the Developing W ܛ  H[Y\\YHH][YX[[]\]K][\و\۝X[و\HXH[XZ[ \XH\œX\Y[\\X\X[H][[[]\]K'H[YH\Hۈ ؙ\ M 8'HH[]Z]HX\H[Y[X\H]H]H\\]Y H\۸&]YX[K\\قۙ[Xܘ][ۈ]H STHZ\[\\XK\و\\X\\[ۙXY]BZX^[]]H܈YܚX[\[[[Y\[˜[[YXۛ^H[\X[KHܝ[]Bܚ[[\[ Y\]Z\YXܘ]ܞB]Y\[[[Y[\[Y\™Z[[XXHXX[^\Y[K'[HX\Y[YXܚ][Hق\H[H\X\YY[X\وB\\\X\ܛ\ 8'HH^\H^Bو[˂H^\]H[و[YYܘ[]B\\YXXYX\[]YXH\™^ܝY[ۙHܛH܈[\[ٝ[X\ZHHXH[[ݙHH\[™HHZ] ݚYHK\XYY XYKBYX][۝[Y[Xۜ[Y\˂'ۘHH\[[YHHZ]\H[[ݙY N