Agri Kultuur January / January 2018 - Page 45

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 Phytopathogens affecting post-harvest fruits: (1) Asexual Botrytis cinerea spores, also known as grey mould. (Courtesy of Paul Bachi, University of Kentucky Research and Education Center*) ; (2) Alternaria brassicicola on cabbage; (3) Spores of the Alternaria fungus. (Courtesy Bruce Watt); (4) Filamentous growth of Rhizopus stolonifer, also known as bread mould, on a peach. (Courtesy of University of Georgia Plant Pathology, University of Georgia*) ; (5) Spores of Rhizopus stolonifer, also known as bread mould. (Courtesy of Charles Averre, North Carolina State University*) ; (6)Monilinia fructigen, or brown rot on a nectarine; (7) Spores of Monilinia fructicola. (Courtesy of Tom Creswell, Purdue University*) ; (8) Symptoms of Penicillium expansum, also known as blue mould, expressed on an apple. (Courtesy of Gerald Holmes, California Polytechnic State University at San Luis Obispo*) ; (9) Spores of the Penicillium spp. fungi. (Courtesy of Gerald Holmes, California Polytechnic State University at San Luis Obispo*) * Bugwood.org “Another advantage is that the lipopeptides’ mechanism of action is the non-specific disruption of the cell membrane, suggesting that they will be effective against a wide spectrum of phytopathogens, including resistant strains.” Future research To improve product purity, the next step will be the application of a more selective process. AgriKultuur |AgriCulture Called macroporous resin adoption, it is a process where the lipopeptides are absorbed into the resin surface under optimal conditions of pH, temperature and solvent composition. For commercial application, the process has to be adapted to produce the lipopeptide in higher volumes of a standardised quality and purity, delivering a product of low to medium value that is cost-competitive. 45