Adviser Update Summer 2016 - Page 36

How to Benefit Immediately? ALUMNI INVOLVEMENT Journalism alumni have insight regarding student press rights and other scholastic journalism interests. They can speak with greater awareness, credibility and understanding than most citizens without such a background. Alumni can make “noise” while students and their journalism mentors are silenced by administrators who arbitrarily censor speech that is unpopular, disagreeable, critical or otherwise unwelcomed by those with power. Alumni, who are not subordinate to school officials, can demand transparency, accountability and rationale without a fear of reprisals. Scholastic media alumni can be helpful to the Student Press Law Center, America’s ardent advocate for student press rights. By providing local support for protecting student press rights and by providing financial, moral and advocacy support for the SPLC, alumni can wield significant power. ADVISER ACTION Every staff can benefit by obtaining resources produced by the Echo alumni: the 40-page conceptual memory book “treasure,” a CD of newspaper “voices” and access to four YouTube videos that can help initiate conversations about the value of journalism education. Echo alumni donated hundreds of copies of the memory book to the Student Press Law Center in Washington, D.C. They hired professionals to assist in the production of the new resources. The goal is to provide inspirational how-to and motivation to other media staffs. The committee has made it easy to obtain the new resources. Simply make a tax-deductible donation of any size to the Student Press Law Center here. Receive a free resource for your journalism program as availability permits. At the same time, immediately assist SPLC, which is now involved in 21 additional state campaigns, all costly, for a Freedom of Expression law. Stay engaged! PERSPECTIVE: RANDY SWIKLE “Glenbard East’s Echo newspaper (Lombard, Illinois), not only told, it showed; not only reported, it influenced; not only stirred, it spurred,” said Randy Swikle, a member of the Illinois Press Foundation and the 1999 Dow Jones News Fund National High School Journalism Teacher of the Year. “When I attended the remarkable May 2, 2015, reunion of Echo alumni — 190 former staff members representing a 26-year span under Howard Spanogle’s mentorship — I anticipated an extraordinary event that would validate the value of scholastic journalism.” Swikle knew this unique gathering would be more than a celebration of camaraderie and of good times past. “These were people who learned early to probe for substance. Any partying would be secondary to sharing prodigious perceptions of free and responsible student news media. Alumni shared experiences with purpose: Show that empowering student journalists with the functions of authentic American journalism serves the best interests of school communities,” he said. “I expected to be wowed — and I was.” Being a strong advocate for freedom of expression, Swikle valued the unique contributions of the EchoXtra 2015 celebration: “The congenial, engaging reunion of Echo alumni was accented by peripheral activities and media creations the alumni produced for their gathering. The EchoXtra 40-page memory book, the CD history of Echo art, articles and pages and the DVDs of memorable speeches and thoughtful interviews were inspiring on many levels,” he said. “They … delivered rationale, evidence and powerful support justifying student news media that exemplify the role and values of American journalism.” He believes the reunion package functions as a compelling rebuttal to arguments advanced by autocratic school authorities who deny student news media the status of designated public forums. The package, according to Swikle, delivers a status that maximizes the results of First Amendment freedoms. “Authenticated success,” he added, “trumps contrived fears and selfserving agendas. The reunion, with its panoramic dynamics, provided solid evidence of the benefits of free, responsible student news media. Who can argue against success?” In the YouTube videos, alumni, now prominent achievers in their occupational fields, have credibility as they testify about the value of scholastic journalism and how their experiences as student reporters influenced their lives. Alumni speakers included a NASA astronaut who flew on two space missions, award-winning journalists, eminent business executives, inspiring educators and others who reflected on the insights they gained by pursuing and practicing professional standards of journalism. How to Benefit Immediately? ALUMNI INVOLVEMENT Journalism alumni have insight regarding student press rights and other scholastic journalism interests. They can speak with greater awareness, credibility and understanding than most citizens without such a background. Alumni can make “noise” while students and their journalism mentors are silenced by administrators who arbitrarily censor speech that is unpopular, disagreeable, critical or otherwise unwelcomed by those with power. Alumni, who are not subordinate to school officials, can demand transparency, accountability and rationale without a fear of reprisals. Scholastic media alumni can be helpful to the Student Press Law Center, America’s ardent advocate for student press rights. By providing local support for protecting student press rights and by providing financial, moral and advocacy support for the SPLC, alumni can wield significant power. ADVISER ACTION Every staff can benefit by obtaining resources produced by the Echo alumni: the 40-page conceptual memory book “treasure,” a CD of newspaper “voices” and access to four YouTube videos that can help initiate conversations about the value of journalism education. Echo alumni donated hundreds of copies of the memory book to the Student Press Law Center in Washington, D.C. They hired professionals to assist in the production of the new resources. The goal is to provide inspirational how-to and motivation to other media staffs. The committee has made it easy to obtain the new resources. Simply make a tax-deductible donation of any size to the Student Press Law Center here. Receive a free resource for your journalism program as availability permits. At the same time, immediately assist SPLC, which is now involved in 21 additional state campaigns, all costly, for a Freedom of Expression law. Stay engaged! PERSPECTIVE: RANDY SWIKLE “Glenbard East’s Echo newspaper (Lombard, Illinois), not only told, it showed; not only reported, it influenced; not only stirred, it spurred,” said Randy Swikle, a member of the Illinois Press Foundation and the 1999 Dow Jones News Fund National High School Journalism Teacher of the Year. “When I attended the remarkable May 2, 2015, reunion of Echo alumni — 190 former staff members representing a 26-year span under Howard Spanogle’s mentorship — I anticipated an extraordinary event that would validate the value of scholastic journalism.” Swikle knew this unique gathering would be more than a celebration of camaraderie and of good times past. “These were people who learned early to probe for substance. Any partying would be secondary to sharing prodigious perceptions of free and responsible student news media. Alumni shared experiences with purpose: Show that empowering student journalists with the functions of authentic American journalism serves the best interests of school communities,” he said. “I expected to be wowed — and I was.” Being a strong advocate for freedom of expression, Swikle valued the unique contributions of the EchoXtra 2015 celebration: “The congenial, engaging reunion of Echo alumni was accented by peripheral activities and media creations the alumni produced for their gathering. The EchoXtra 40-page memory book, the CD history of Echo art, articles and pages and the DVDs of memorable speeches and thoughtful interviews were inspiring on many levels,” he said. “They … delivered rationale, evidence and powerful support justifying student news media that exemplify the role and values of American journalism.” He believes the reunion package functions as a compelling rebuttal to arguments advanced by autocratic school authorities who deny student news media the status of designated public forums. The package, according to Swikle, delivers a status that maximizes the results of First Amendment freedoms. “Authenticated success,” he added, “trumps contrived fears and selfserving agendas. The reunion, with its panoramic dynamics, provided solid evidence of the benefits of free, \ۜXHY[]YYXK˜[\YHYZ[X\'B[H[UXHY[[[[KZ[[XY]\[Z\\][ۘ[Y[]HܙYX[]B\^H\YHX]H[YHق\X\[\H[Z\^\Y[\\Y[\ܝ\š[Y[YZ\]\˂[[[HXZ\[YYHTB\ۘ]]]ۈXBZ\[ۜ]\ ][[\[\[Z[[\[\^X]]\[\[™YX]ܜ[\YXYۈH[Y^HZ[YB\Z[[XX[ٙ\[ۘ[[\و\[\K