Advertising Standards Bureau Review of Operations 2016 2016 Review of operations_WEB - Page 59

AANA Wagering Code Directed primarily to minors Depiction of minors Section 2.1 of the Wagering Code states: Advertising or Marketing Communication for a Wagering Product or Service must not, having regard to the theme, visuals and language used, be directed primarily to Minors. Section 2.2 of the Wagering Code states: Advertising or Marketing Communication for a Wagering Product or Service must not depict a person who is a Minor unless the person is shown in an incidental role in a natural situation and where there is no implication they will engage in wagering activities. In 2016 the Board considered two cases under this section. There are no specific provisions restricting the placement and frequency of a wagering advertisement under the Wagering Code. An advertisement which is not attractive to children as a result of its theme, visuals and language will not breach this provision of the Wagering Code. • • The Board dismissed a complaint about a wagering ad which showed a horse race and details of a wagering promotion as it was not directed to children (Crownbet – 0506/16). The Board dismissed a complaint about a wagering ad which was broadcast during a children’s show on Pandora Radio, as the advertisement itself was not directed to children (Ladbroke.com.au – 0445/16). In 2016 the Board upheld a complaint against one advertisement under this section, noting the wording is very specific with regards to minors not being used in advertising material for wagering products or services unless in an incidental role. • The Board upheld a complaint about a television advertisement promoting a wagering activity which depicted minors discussing what they would buy if they had a lot of money (Make a Wish – 0551/16). Consumption of alcohol Section 2.4 of the Wagering Code states: Advertising or Marketing Communication for a Wagering Product or Service must not portray, condone or encourage wagering in combination with the consumption of alcohol. In 2016 the Board considered two cases under this section. In both cases although people were shown drinking, the Board considered that if it is not clear that it is alcohol, the advertising is not in breach of this section. Review of Operations 2016 • The Board dismissed a complaint about an advertisement on television and cinema which shows a man spitting while cheering but did not show consumption of any alcohol (Ladbroke.com.au – 0370/16 and 0371/16). Promise of winning Section 2.5 of the Wagering Code states: Advertising or Marketing Communication for a Wagering Product or Service must not state or imply a promise of winning. In 2016 the Board considered six cases under this section. The Board determined that advertising for wagering products or services which include promotions such as a ‘matched bonus bet’ or ‘money back’ does not imply a promise of winning. • The Board dismissed a complaint about a television advertisement which included a promotion of receiving a matched bonus bet up to $50 if you place a certain bet on certain races and your horse comes second or third (Crownbet – 0506/16). • The Board dismissed a complaint about a television advertisement which depicted a female presenter on screen talking about a betting ‘special offer’. A male then walks into the frame and queries whether the ‘special offer’ is as special as a money back offer (William Hill – 0329/16). 57